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How to Create Leaders

Community leadership, non-profit organization, thought leadership, consulting, community involvement

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Sam Olmsted
is starting us now.

Sam Olmsted
And Meara, we can just hop back and forth. Would you like me to ask the first question?

Meara McNitt
Yeah, I’m kind of wondering if we should lead into the first question more. It feels kind of sudden. So maybe if we do the intro, you ask Stephen how it’s going and then, Stephen, we can just ask you to elaborate on what you do and how, like just what you do in this role. And then from there we can kind of ask more about leader development.

Sam Olmsted
You’re breaking up a little bit for me, Meara. I don’t know if that’s true for anyone else.

Stephen Reuther
So.

Sam Olmsted
You kind of broke up for a second, Meara, sorry.

Meara McNitt
Oh no, am I gonna have bad internet while this is happening? Sorry, my thought was we introduce Steven separately. You ask Steven how he’s doing and then Steven will kind of ask you to elaborate on what you do at Norley. So that way we can, from there feed into the questions about leader development instead of just being like, so what do you think are the steps?

Sam Olmsted
Yeah, I think that’s a good. So maybe we’ll just say, hey, can you introduce yourself? Or could you elaborate on your mission and things like that? And then Meara, could you ask the next question? And then we’ll hop off back and forth. OK, perfect. All right, take two. Jordan, are we ready whenever?

Stephen Reuther
I know.

Meara McNitt
Yes. That sounds good.

Meara McNitt
Yeah, we’re recording.

Sam Olmsted
Okay, cool. All right. Three, two, one. Well, thanks for joining us, Steven. How are you?

Stephen Reuther
Hey, I’m doing good. Thanks so much for having me.

Sam Olmsted
Yeah, absolutely. So just to start off, do you mind kind of elaborating on what you do at Norley and what your work and your mission is there?

Stephen Reuther
Yeah, sure, absolutely. So I’m the executive director of Norley, which is short for the New Orleans Regional Leadership Institute, which is a little bit of a mouthful, which is why we go by Norley. But essentially we’re a professional development and more specifically a leadership development program for Southeast Louisiana, the 10 parishes in Southeast Louisiana for individuals who are already leaders within their companies and the nonprofit sector, perhaps running for elected office or serving in a public service realm in some capacity.

And so we bring together those individuals through a nine month course and essentially teach them about core fundamental civic issues that impact the work that they’re doing, as well as give them the opportunity to collaborate, build relationships, and hopefully use those relationships to benchmark against one another and sort of tighten up all those soft and intangible sort of skill sets and relationships that help make a region thrive and make it so healthy. And…

make it have a better future, which is of course what we’re all hoping for.

Meara McNitt
So it sounds like if to make sure I got this right, so you take people who already have a talent or are already performing leadership in some way and kind of mold and grow them into bigger leadership abilities, is that right?

Stephen Reuther
Absolutely, and our philosophy is that there’s no single leadership sort of profile. And so we meet individuals where they are, and they’re obviously to be part of our program and to have an interest in our program. They’re typically doing outstanding things within their work and within the community. And so we try to create opportunities for them to have greater capacity, greater understanding, again, really build those networks and expand their relationship so that in whatever way they want to have an impact moving forward.

They have an entire network and greater opportunities to do that.

Sam Olmsted
Perfect. So what do you think those key steps are for creating leaders within a community? And how do you actually cultivate that interest within New Orleans? I know that you have a lot of diverse groups of folks that come through the program from the public sector, from the private sector, and kind of anywhere in between. What are the what are those steps that you take to help shape those leaders?

Stephen Reuther
Yeah, sure. So we’ve been in existence since 2000. So 23 years now we have a great legacy of leadership and obviously just around 950 individuals who have participated in our program in that time period. So we have a really strong huge network of individuals who love the program, had a fantastic experience in it, and it gave them an opportunity to maybe dig a little bit deeper and learn a little bit more about the region in which they work.

my philosophy personally is that anybody has the capabilities of being a leader, right? But not every individual always has that opportunity. And so in my mind, it’s really me and an individual where they are giving them an opportunity if they so choose to do that, right? If they want it, because not everybody is in a position necessarily where they want that for whatever reasons in their personal or professional life. But assuming an individual is interested in that role, you have to give them an opportunity and then you have to empower them.

to fully realize their skill sets and the opportunities within whatever that challenge might be, right? And so I think there’s a couple of other dynamics that come into play, which is that you wanna set an individual up for success, right? You wanna create an atmosphere or an environment where hopefully whatever it is they’re trying to do, they can be successful at it. And obviously on the flip side of that, you don’t wanna put an individual in a position where they’re going to fail.

You want to challenge an individual, you want them to be able to be aspirational and to reach and to work really hard to achieve that, but you want them to hopefully find success at the tail end of it. And so, again, my sort of philosophy in it is that you find an individual, you try to give them the knowledge, the information, the opportunities to challenge themselves, to find that personal and professional growth that allow them to become the best version of themselves. And then you try to create the right atmosphere and have the right circumstances so that they actually achieve that.

They build that momentum, they build that self-confidence, and then they can roll that forward into their future endeavors.

Sam Olmsted
And I’ll just jump in to say that full disclosure, I’m in the Norley class of 2023, and it’s a fantastic experience. And I think sort of building on what you said, one of the best parts of the experience for me is just the exposure to different people from different groups that I probably would not have met before. And just seeing what they do on a daily basis, they come in on a monthly meeting schedule with their own challenges and what they’ve been doing for the past few weeks.

So you really get a glimpse into the different parishes and the different groups within those parishes. And then, you know, on top of that, seeing the curriculum that you put forward and how those people react to that knowledge that they learn on a monthly basis as well. It’s really interesting.

Stephen Reuther
Yeah, Sam, thank you for sharing that. And we’re very deliberate in terms of what we do. And what I call is it’s curating a class. And if you think in your own personal life about the people that you regularly interact with, your family, your friends, it could be your dentist, could be your veterinarian, could be your coworkers, it could be maybe individuals that you go to church with or whoever the case might be. Typically, your network is a lot more narrow than you might normally think. And when you really try to think about,

where is there a great deal of difference in perspective and experiences for my own in my life? I think most of us actually fall pretty short in terms of actually having that. And so we’re very deliberate in trying to build out classes where you’ll be exposed to different perspectives, different ideas. And again, one thing that we always try to encourage is that your personal opinions are based upon your perspectives and experiences that you’ve had. They’re true, they’re a hundred percent valid.

but that does not discredit or devalue someone else’s opinion, which is based upon their own personal experiences and perspectives, right? Those things can and should mutually exist. And so that’s when I think the true magic of sort of leadership development happens is when you’re able to have respectful and kind conversations about hard topics and you can share your perspectives. And hopefully both parties can have sort of a teachable moment in that process. And

Again, it’s not about converting or changing anybody’s mindset to anything. It’s just about becoming more aware of someone else’s perspective and maybe incorporating that into your own personal view or thoughts or philosophies when you, uh, you know, encounter an issue or, or problem in the future. And hopefully you’ll be a better decision maker or better leader of individuals as a result of that.

Meara McNitt
You know, Stephen, you saying how people aren’t getting exposed to as much diversity of opinion and experience in their day to day life. It honestly, so what Sam was saying about how he’s coming together with all these different people, I was thinking like, wow, I feel like the last time I really was in that situation was in college and being at university and either in organizations or classes and being exposed to all these people who are different from me. And so then when you’re like, yeah, like in your day to day life, it’s probably not that different. I was like, you’re right. Because it was years ago.

UNO that I was experiencing that. And I think it’s also so important that like, to be good leaders, you have to have that exposure to other people and their experiences and know how to communicate through and around them. And I think a lot of leaders are missing that when they don’t have, you know, coaching or like, don’t work through it through something like this. So can you,

Sam Olmsted
Thank you.

Meara McNitt
kind of like practice events that y’all do to help people navigate how to have those difficult conversations or any like tips that you would give to someone listening.

Stephen Reuther
So I think some of the immediate things, you know, and this is a larger statement that isn’t meant to be political in nature or anything like that, but we’re all very siloed in terms of how we get our media, how that media aggregates what we would be interested in and obviously pushes into our feed through algorithms, things that it knows is gonna keep our attention, right, for an extended period of time. And then when you combine that with sort of political philosophies and…

you know, how you identify with certain issues nationally or internationally. It’s very easy, very suddenly, to maybe not getting the full breadth of, again, perspectives or thoughts that, you know, I think everybody would benefit from. In our program, the most essential thing that we do in the beginning is just kind of set the stage and manage expectations and kind of encourage and prepare people that throughout the course of this program,

We might have difficult situations. It might be conversations that make you feel uncomfortable. It might be conversations that you’re not familiar with. But we want your active participation in it. That’s how you grow. There’s a lot of leadership talk and a lot of different Ted talks and things of that nature around getting comfortable with being uncomfortable. And I would say that that’s certainly true of these sort of dynamic leadership conversations. And I would say beyond that, it’s true.

any sort of individual who has aspirations of doing something meaningful and of greater depth and experience in their life, right? And it’s just kind of the simple thing of, if it’s not necessarily a challenge, is it really worth doing, right? Are you really growing in that process? And so again, I think for our program, we just set the stage where these conversations may occur, they most likely will occur, and it’s important to be…

open, honest, and respectful, and again, appreciate that someone else’s perspective could inform the way you think in ways that you don’t yet know. I mean, we don’t know what we don’t know, right? So just sit down, buckle up, and have an open mind, and let those conversations where they go, and that’ll be a healthy dynamic, and hopefully a healthy learning opportunity for everybody. But again, to me, it’s about managing expectations and the understanding around how those conversations happen.

Sam Olmsted
And I just want to jump in to say that, you know, in our last conversation at Norley, it was about healthcare. And, um, we went to a hospital, the opening panel of the day was a doctor, uh, healthcare administrator and a healthcare economist. And they didn’t necessarily agree on certain elements. And it was 9 AM. It was the first conversation of the day. It sparked a lot of conversation and side chat. And, um,

Stephen Reuther
Yeah.

Sam Olmsted
you know, follow up questions afterward. And I think that’s sort of what Stephen’s mentioning is if it’s not difficult, is it worth doing as in if these conversations aren’t happening because they’re too difficult, then you’re never going to tackle the underlying issues or the greater, um, you know, things that we face as a 10 parish region. Um, and I think that’s kind of the magic that you’ve talked about as well. Stephen.

Stephen Reuther
And I would say also, I mean, it’s a two-part process, right? Number one, you have to have the right set of individuals who are participating in that conversation or on that panel. And then the second half of it is you have to ask the right questions that are gonna get at these deeper conversations. Now, obviously that’s part of my responsibility for my role within the program is to help make sure that we get there, that I have those questions prepared. But what we often find, especially Sam, with your class,

is that a lot of those questions arise organically, right? Because we build the program around trying to address and have conversations around topics that are timely and relevant. And so the class leaders are gonna have these same questions no matter who they are and sort of what specialization or field that they’re working in, right? So these questions, the questions are just as important as the speakers, but it’s really a two-part building process of having the right people, having the right questions.

and then how all those factors interact in order to challenge your own thoughts. So yeah, I mean, it’s a multi-part process to make it happen.

Meara McNitt
You know, I feel like a lot of this doesn’t apply only to leaders. Like this can be taken to interpersonal relationships, just like me to my parents, me to someone on my team. It doesn’t have to be leaders knowing these questions to ask. So do you have any advice of like how to ask these right questions? Perhaps if it is just interpersonally and someone’s like, we have to have the hard conversation, how can I dig into it? What how do you teach people how to come up with these questions?

Stephen Reuther
Wow, that’s a great question. I would say, first of all, it comes from years of experience of running events and programs and panels. You kind of learn what falls flat and what kind of gets people’s creative juices flowing. But I think at the core level, it starts with the individual, right? And having, developing your own sense of understanding and agency around whatever topic you’re discussing. But the second part is being intellectually curious.

So it’s very hard to come up with the right questions if you haven’t done a certain amount of preemptive work. You know, you mentioned how some of this could be applicable to families or friends or whatever the circumstances might be. You know, I think when you talk about leadership, one of the most important things that is, I talked about us not having a leadership profile. However, I would say probably 99% of the time, a leader is an excellent communicator.

right, and how that communication happens typically, hopefully, honestly and openly and transparently, that dictates a lot of how the conversation is going to go. Obviously, people can over communicate to the point of it being burdensome, but I would argue that the vast majority of the time people under communicate and there’s a lot of nuance that occurs. And even as we’re recording this, you know, there’s nuance that maybe isn’t captured within.

a webcam, right, of body language, of how we perceive things, that you pick up all those subtleties in person. And so communicating and communicating in a healthy way, and to an adequate amount, I think is a key part of doing that with family. But again, just being intellectually curious, being willing to engage in the conversation to begin with, and then kind of drawing boundaries on what is or isn’t comfortable, or if someone says something.

maybe that is off putting to you for whatever reason, you can say, you know, I’m really not comfortable with this, but this is why. You know, I don’t see things that way. You know, it’s easy to be reactionary and or defensive and to have a strong statement counter pointing it. But I think the more important thing is to kind of take it in, synthesize it, process it and say, I don’t agree with you. And this is why I don’t agree with you and why this, you know, aspect of our conversations.

Stephen Reuther
making me uncomfortable or unhappy. So again, I think communicating just in its most basic form is the most important part of that process for any leader. And it’s a skill that luckily is transferable to all other aspects of your life.

Sam Olmsted
So Stephen, you are also a leader. You train leaders, you run leadership groups, but you’re also a leader and you’re in so many groups and you’ve been in so many groups, maybe more than anyone I’ve ever met. And I guess the question is, what role does community involvement, being involved in nonprofits, sitting on the boards of different organizations and just having your hand in all these different areas.

What role does that have in leadership creation? And do you kind of need to be the type of person that gets into these type of groups in order to really excel as a leader?

Stephen Reuther
So first of all, thank you for the kind words. Well, even though I’ve been doing this sort of work for quite a while now and have had various leadership roles and responsibilities, it’s still very uncomfortable for me. I still feel like an imposter, you know, with imposter syndrome in some of these scenarios. But I think one of the most important things, if you’re a leader, if you engage in those sorts of activities where you give…

time, treasure, whatever other resources you have, energy ideas to an organization or to an initiative or movement, you’re probably most likely gonna be surrounded by individuals who have that same sort of passion for whatever the topic is. And it’s no different than if you’re a professional athlete or whatever you do in life, you wanna be surrounded by people who are gonna challenge you and people who are there doing all the right things for all the right reasons. So for me,

When I became involved in a lot of these different boards and organizations that I’ve served on, number one, I learned more about their mission. I learned more about their programs. I learned more about logistics and how do these things happen? How are decisions made within a boardroom setting? Who’s included or excluded from those decisions for better or for worse? All the different subtleties, nuance, and dynamics that maybe you don’t see from outside of that

That all informs how you make decisions and sort of what your leadership style will be and what is or isn’t effective, right? In communication and in leading individuals and inspiring them to do great work. But again, I think the most important thing is everybody has a different philosophy and style to things. You can go into it, you can develop and scratch some of that intellectual curiosity that you have, because ultimately you’re surrounded.

by a brain trust of individuals who have, again, different backgrounds, different experiences, and different expertise and skill sets than you have, right? And then beyond that, you’re working with individuals who, assumably, can challenge you to bring out better versions of yourself. And if you’re practicing, you don’t want to, you know, practice basketball on the individual that you can dunk on all day and beat, you know, 76 to four.

Stephen Reuther
you want to play in a competitive game because that’s the most fun way of getting better and challenging yourself. And it elevates everybody’s game. Right. So I think serving in that capacity does that in a general way. And then the other thing I would say about public service or serving on a board, depending on the organization and its mission vision is it helps you to develop empathy. Right. And understanding not just of your fellow board members, but

if you serve on the board of a truly charitable organization or a board that has stakeholders in the community, that maybe normally you’d be disconnected from, right? Or you just don’t have any interaction with. You maybe develop a greater sense of connection, empathy for what individuals go through because now you have an opportunity to interact with those individuals, hear their stories, hear their experiences, understand how it contrasts with your own experiences and thoughts.

And hopefully next time you have to make a decision either within that organization or in the larger realm of the community, you can make a better decision on behalf of everybody who’s impacted by that decision. Does that make sense?

Sam Olmsted
Yeah, absolutely. And it’s also a little disheartening that maybe imposter syndrome never goes away, huh?

Stephen Reuther
I think you just kind of learn to live with, you know?

Meara McNitt
Yeah.

Sam Olmsted
Hehehe

Meara McNitt
So we here at Online Optimism, we have a kind of like quarterly program that is facilitated by some of our staff members. That kind of is to help with professional growth for everyone in the company. And this past quarter, our theme was imposter syndrome. So would you give any words of advice to anyone who’s earlier in their career? So they don’t have experience and time, but anything that would encourage them in fighting the imposter syndrome?

Stephen Reuther
I think, so I often think about this Bob Dylan song, which is called My Back Pages. And in it, he’s, you know, waxing poetic, all these things in the world that he wants to change and be involved in. And then the chorus is, but I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now, right? And so the idea is that when you’re younger, you think, you know, you have this ideal vision, you know exactly what needs to be done to solve whatever problems.

But kind of as you get older, you realize you know what you don’t know and you’re humbled by that. So I think there’s a really weird dynamic depending on when where you are in your career and maybe what life experiences you’ve had right as an individual. I think what I would say for a younger version of me and often I was in rooms and I thought there’s no reason I should be in this room with these people. They are far more accomplished and knowledgeable than I am.

But I would end up in these rooms. And I think what I would say is that if you have access to that room for any reason, use it for good and maybe trust in the fact that you’re there for a reason. And maybe you’re not the most knowledgeable and maybe you’re not the most experienced and maybe you can’t add the greatest dynamic to the conversation, but you’re there for a reason. So just be respectful, understand your role with that and where you can make a positive contribution.

that is constructive do that. And then I think the flip side is that as you mature in your career and things evolve, you just kind of have to settle into it, you know? And I think probably maybe I’m gonna spin this in a positive way, which is that maybe the reason I feel like I’m always an imposter even to this day, even though I get up in front of a room and can deliver a speech or do whatever I have to do, it’s because I’m constantly…

interacting with individuals who again challenge me to be a better version of myself, who challenge my own thoughts. I’m personally growing. And so it’s very hard to feel that confident in the world when you know that there’s so much that you don’t know. And part of that is again surrounding yourself by the right people who not intentionally, not in a malicious way, but constantly remind you just through your conversations with them of how much you don’t know about so many different topics.

Stephen Reuther
So I think that’s what I would say to the younger me for imposter syndrome. And as you’re older, just embrace it as a gift that you can be in that space and you can continue to learn and become a better version of yourself. We never stop improving. Our bodies just slowly give out on us, but our brains, our brains are sharp.

Meara McNitt
You know, I think that if you’re in a room and you’re looking around and you’re like, oh, I don’t belong with all these people, those people decided you belong in the room. And so if you think that they know what they’re doing, you got to know they also know what they’re doing by letting you be in the room. I have one last question for you about leadership and developing the leadership. What can…

Stephen Reuther
Absolutely.

Meara McNitt
oversee an organization that has to do with a community that you’re not necessarily involved in. What actions can leaders do that build trust with the community or the organization, but without being performative or disingenuous?

Stephen Reuther
Yeah, so, you know, a big concept that’s going around is authentic leadership, right? And there’s something to that. And I’ll say just kind of my own riff on that concept is just show up, be present, be genuine, you know? And I kind of think it’s that simple, you know? Mean what you say and say what you’re going to do and then follow through on it. And, you know, it’s, I think more times than not,

One thing that I’ve discovered in my life and in my career is that sometimes there are really difficult problems or issues that you can’t personally tackle, right? Or even be part of a movement to tackle. But sometimes there are things that you can change. And I sit there and I think, this is ridiculous. Why hasn’t anybody done this before? Right? Surely I’m not the first person to see this or think this.

And the reality is that people are in different phases of their lives. Not everybody has the opportunity or whatever to be able to engage in that. And so I think it’s just being willing to be that person to step up and do it. And even if you don’t know exactly what you’re doing or you don’t fully understand the impact or consequences of your actions, I think it’s important to just show up and to make an honest and good contribution where you can. And if it’s

goes a little south on you, then you’ll learn from that mistake and you’ll improve for yourself in the future. But I think just showing up and being genuine listening is a very important skill set, active listening, being there so that people can know, you know, they’re making eye contact with you and you’re hearing what they’re saying and you mean it and you’re following through on it. And if you can’t do that, then maybe wait until you reach a point in your life or your career where you can be present in that way.

and in that moment. But I think that’s the easiest thing, to show up and do it.

Meara McNitt
I think this.

Sam Olmsted
that answer and I think that listening is usually the answer.

Meara McNitt
Yeah, I just want to, you said earlier this line that I think about a lot and I think it kind of just ties everything together that you’ve said is just that you don’t know what you don’t know. And being conscious of that I think can help in a lot of the scenarios that we talked about

Sam Olmsted
Oh, sorry, I talked over your email.

Stephen Reuther
Yeah, well, in the realm of Google, it’s easy for everybody to be an expert. It’s much more difficult to sort of say, well, I know I could Google this, but maybe I ought to go see my cardiologist about this. Maybe I ought to talk to the physicist about this. You know, there are experts in that space. And part of that part of being a good leader, if not a great leader, is having the humility to know that you don’t know everything and that those individuals have dedicated.

significant portions of their lives and careers and expertise to knowing what they know. And it’s about delegating responsibility when and where it makes sense and deferring to the true experts in that space to help guide you into making better decisions.

Sam Olmsted
Well, perfect. I wanted to wrap up with one kind of last question before we close here. And you, Stephen, really have a finger on the pulse of Louisiana in terms of the economy, the culture, the businesses and the nonprofits and organizations that exist here. So I just want to ask what you’re optimistic about in terms of the future of Louisiana, the future of our region, and really the future of the people here.

Stephen Reuther
I think that’s a great question. So, you know, I think Louisiana as a state, I’ll take this at a couple of different levels. I think Louisiana as a state, if you look at us from our natural resources, right, this is a purely economic sort of answer. If you look at us from a natural resource sort of perspective from oil and gas, you can talk about the ports and the port infrastructure, can talk about timber, you can talk about agriculture and aquaculture. You know, we…

we have a robust and interesting economy, right? That yes, with the oil bust in the late 70s, early 80s, we lost some corporate headquarters, but it’s become more diversified to where now we’re talking about entrepreneurship around the state. We’ve been very forward thinking about how to support and develop small businesses. And even more recently, we’ve been very forward thinking about alternative energy sources, right? Everything from wind power to hydrogen to all these sorts of different concepts. So…

I think when you look at our resources, there’s a lot to be bullish about because a lot of other places don’t have that, right? And I know our existential threat obviously is water, either through hurricanes or sea level rise, those sorts of things. I think I would rather be in that position trying to fight that than to deal with water scarcity, which is a very big issue in many other parts of the country. So again, I think looking at our natural resources, there’s a lot to be excited about.

And then I think when you look at innovation and sort of forward thinking as a state, but certainly as a region, the greater New Orleans region, I think we all felt like for those of us who were here at that time, we got a second chance, right? With following Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Rita, Hurricane Isaac, the BP, Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

We’ve had consistently different opportunities to re-envision what the future likes. And not only have we become more resilient, not only have we made investments in hardening our infrastructure, but we’ve been innovative and forward thinking about, okay, well, how do we deal with these threats in the future? So one thing that I love the idea of is that as different coastal communities deal with sea level rise, we have the Coastal Master Plan, which is a huge thing for us. And it’s really setting the stage for a future.

Stephen Reuther
that is viable and successful for the state of Louisiana, especially South Louisiana, but it’s also a model that many other states haven’t yet gotten to yet. And not only have we put together a plan, but we’re figuring out how to fund it, realizing that is a major component of it. So I think when you look at sort of that intellectual innovation, you look at the natural resources, and then you just look at the cultural assets that we have that really buoy up the community and give us our why for being here.

think there’s a lot to be bullish about. I know, obviously, major metropolitan areas around the country are suffering now for a variety of different reasons. And I think what I would say is that economically, culturally, as well as in terms of human capital, we’re actually, I think, right on the precipice or right on the brink of doing really incredible things that can redefine the future of our state. And if they aren’t already, we’re

really act as a beacon of hope and inspiration for other parts of the country that are similar to us. So I’m very excited and bullish on the future. We just got to make it happen. It’s part of showing up.

Sam Olmsted
Absolutely, what an answer. I loved all of it. So thank you so much for that All right. Well, I think we’re gonna wrap up here and Before we go. I just want to ask, you know, Stephen, where can people find you find information about norley and And follow you on social media

Stephen Reuther
Sure, absolutely. We’re on all sort of the typical channels, not on TikTok, but we are on Facebook. Yes, but we are. I won’t be doing any fancy 30 second videos on TikTok anytime soon. But no, we’re on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and we do have a podcast of our own that we do as well called Leadership Dialogues. But the easiest way to really get in touch with us is through our website norly.org, N-O-R-L-I.O-R-G.

Sam Olmsted
Yet.

Sam Olmsted
Hehehe

Stephen Reuther
And from there, it’s really kind of the central hub to be able to access us and be able to connect with us through all those other channels. So check out the website, come visit us, and you can always send me an email, steven, sdephen, at norley.org, and I’ll be glad to sit down and talk with you.

Sam Olmsted
Well, perfect. Thank you so much for joining us. We really appreciated the talk. I know we learned a lot about what it takes to become a leader and how to cultivate leadership within your own organization or your family. So thank you for that, Steven.

Stephen Reuther
Excellent, thank you, appreciate it.

Sam Olmsted
Okay, bye.

What is Online Offscript?

Online Offscript is Online Optimism’s official podcast. We created the show to dive deeper into trending topics online. As an agency that works primarily through web-based platforms and media channels, we love to stay up to date on what is influencing the space we work so heavily in.

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